Stalder Group launches clean water fund drive for Typhoon Ulysses victims

(Press Release)

Facial and skincare products and services provider Stalder Group has launched a fund drive that seeks to provide clean water to victims of Typhoon Ulysses in Marikina, Montalban, and other areas.

Company Founder Dina Dela Paz Stalder said the campaign is the long-term support of the Stalder Group to calamity victims following an earlier outreach that saw her and her staff handing purified water, soap, alcohol, and clothes to communities devastated by the typhoon.

“As part of our company corporate social responsibility initiatives, we will launch ‘Clean Water for Every Juan’ effective December 1, 2020. For every purchase worth P2,500 of our clients, one piece of water purifier will be allocated to the people affected by Typhoon Ulysses in Marikina, Montalban, and other areas,” Stalder announced.

Dina and Diana Stalder with shoe business owner and project supporter Anchie Dela Paz and kids in affected areas in Marikina and Montalban.

The name of the client-donor will be affixed on the water purifier to be installed in the affected communities. Stalder noted that clean water is critical in the devastated areas since their water systems were damaged by the typhoon. This was evident when the Stalder Group Cares, the CSR arm of the company, distributed purified water and hygiene kit to victims of Ulysses.

 

“Considering that a lot of wastes, garbage, and sludge brought about by the widespread floods contaminated the water supply of our fellow typhoon victims, the source of clean and safe drinking water was immensely affected. All of the families and individuals in the evacuation centers, most especially the children, are in need of clean drinking water to sustain their daily life,” Stalder stressed.

The Clean Water for Every Juan drive, according to Stalder, will address at least one basic need of the Ulysses victims as they get back on their feet, particularly since around 90% of those that were brought to evacuation centers no longer have homes to return to based on the survey made by local officials.